Pic captured during video shooting.  Trying to make samples for a man that grows a full size in a workout wasn't easy!
See what happens when the casting of a commercial is surprisingly interrupted by the the formidable Dwayne Johnson.
Who better than the US Army should represent a style copied the world over?
 
Who better to Rock it?
The sweatshirt is reminiscent of the early ARMY Football team's jersey with a saddle shoulder, yet updated with contrasted heavy weight uneven slubby loops exposed to the outside of the body.  
The relaxed cargo patch pocket pants taper at the bottom for a modern fit, giving comfort in the thigh and the crotch while allowing the bottom hems to roll, tuck or fold at the boot or shoe.  The print is an adaption of the Vietnam Tiger Camo rescaled smaller and printed on a 2-ply twill yarn.  Exposed webbing and rivets add strength while the lower exposed zippers give ease of entry for cellphones and other items while driving a tank, jeep, SUV (or even a small car, but Why?).
Each of the collection's garments has a level of attention to detail that adds to the authenticity and strength of the US ARMY Brand.  To see these images without reading what is behind the development is to read a headline caption without the story.
Taken from the Battle of the Bulge in WWII, and worn in the recent movie "Fury", this Tank Jacket is recreated in a modern way using advancements that make it Water-repellent, fire-retardant and anti-static.  The contrast cotton rib knit and the wool blend lining block the wind and keep you warm yet retain breathability.
 A sateen weave gives a sheen to the firm shell fabric that harks back to nylon flight satin bombers.
This is a Stonewashed PU coated cotton. Most of the PU comes off in the wash due to the length and temperature of the washing process.  In each garment there's another long list of unique details, such as these below (warning, can be too much information, but to some aficionados of military clothing, this 'stuff' matters):
• The Zipper pulls are modeled after authentic Scovill type shapes used in WWII.  
• The Webbing tape is 1" wide with a very noticeable grain.  
• A smaller and narrower webbing of a different weave and with a stiffer feel is used to lift the Slot Buttons away from the body for easier manipulation, with and without gloves.  
• Multirow stitching on the facing of the placket and zig-zag on the inner placket add rigidity through firmer interfacing.  
• The Hood is removable and lined with a heavily stonewashed synthetic pile to give it an more aged and genuine look.
• The Fake Fox fur is of a higher quality than any I could find and highly simulates fur.
Compare below, the image to the one above.  My photo-retouching for the look book was to emulate one of America's foremost 'Realist' painters, Norman Rockwell.  It was cleaned up and stylized to have a slight painterly qul
Above is the original picture as shot by the photographer. Too dark and too many blemishes on the model's face.
I created the entire look book for $1900 for 52 pages.  No budget or warning from the boss when he said he needs it in 2 weeks.
The total shoot took 4 hours, one photographer, one model, one assistant stylist and myself.  Time to edit, retouch, create a layout in InDesign and send out to print using a plugin took 3 weeks.  One week to print and the 50 books of 52 pages full color came out to a total of $1900.00 
Layered over a cotton hoodie and henley is a Black MA-1 bomber. A little known fact is that there are no Black Nylon jackets in the US ARMY history.  The MA-1 was originally for the Air Force with an Orange lining and began use in the 60's.  This is very unique yet seemingly traditional jacket is reversible to a unique use of a Camo pattern. 
The lightly filled gray knit jersey shell with the olive cotton ripstop lining are combined the way a hoodie is combined with a military outerwear piece. The PU leather edging and zipper piping add durability and a rugged touch to the classic look.  The timelessness of the contemporary jacket is worn over a heavy weight cotton and linen shirt modeled identically from an authentic Army shirt of the 30's & 40's.  The linen blend is used to give the broken in look as you wear it.
Classic winter pants are not as easy to find as you'd think.  These Wool Cargo pants have a skinny bottom opening which tightens up with a functional button tab to fit into boots or keep out severe winds.  
A wool blend herringbone with downfill is cold dyed for an aged and warm look.  It's layered over a PU and Camo woven cotton hoodie and Chambray Mechanic's shirt.  Mechanics often wore other colors than the commonly used Olives of the soldiers.  The use of Denim or Chambray and styles that were specially designed for them and not the battlefield.
Splattering bleaches, inks and such, borrowed from the denim market and applied to the cargo pants change the way you see a classic pant and separate it from the baggy cargoes of the 90's.  
Many brands 'borrow' directly from the US ARMY for inspiration and sometimes We just have to 'BORROW' it back.
This 'Snow Bleach' effect adds and aged quality to a slub Chambray without lightening the overall color of the indigo.
Worn edges on the buttons and the worn print give it the character of a 40 year old vintage garment without the real sweat and stains of secondhand clothing.  Notice the 'Bullet Casing' snaps design to look like actuall bottoms of bullet shell casings.  Firing pin mark included.  (No actual models or assistants were shot in the development of the snaps)
Many options were considered at the beginning stages when first presenting the Merchandising Plan.  Snap development had already been started with the supplier.  In the end, the design changed slightly but the finishes came out great.
Here is an example from the website. It is a breakdown or anatomy of a plaid shirt.  
If you simply want to look at the collection alone, you can download the Look Book here.  
For more detailed images of just the trims or sketches that led to the development, see my other project.
For a video introduction to the brand follow this link.
Additional link to editorial, see : Refinery 29, Other news
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